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Solar Powered Charging Infrastructure For Electric Vehicles

RRP $234.99

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The Paris Agreement on Climate Change adopted on December 12, 2015 is a voluntary effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In order to reach the goals of this agreement, there is a need to generate electricity without greenhouse gas emissions and to electrify transportation. An infrastructure of SPCSs can help accomplish both of these transitions. Globally, expenditures associated with the generation, transmission, and use of electricity are more than one trillion dollars per year. Annual transportation expenditures are also more than one trillion dollars per year. Almost everyone will be impacted by these changes in transportation, solar power generation, and smart grid developments. The benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions will differ with location, but all will be impacted. This book is about the benefits associated with adding solar panels to parking lots to generate electricity, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and provide shade and shelter from rain and snow. The electricity can flow into the power grid or be used to charge electric vehicles (EVs). Solar powered charging stations (SPCSs) are already in many parking lots in many countries of the world. The prices of solar panels have decreased recently, and about 30% of the new U.S. electrical generating capacity in 2015 was from solar energy. More than one million EVs are in service in 2016, and there are significant benefits associated with a convenient charging infrastructure of SPCSs to support transportation with electric vehicles. Solar Powered Charging Infrastructure for Electric Vehicles: A Sustainable Development aims to share information on pathways from our present situation to a world with a more sustainable transportation system with EVs, SPCSs, a modernized smart power grid with energy storage, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and better urban air quality. Covering 200 million parking spaces with solar panels can generate about 1/4 of the electricity that was generated in 2014 in the United States. Millions of EVs with 20 to 50 kWh of battery storage can help with the transition to wind and solar power generation through owners responding to time-of-use prices. Written for all audiences, high school and college teachers and students, those in industry and government, and those involved in community issues will benefit by learning more about the topics addressed in the book. Those working with electrical power and transportation, who will be in the middle of the transition, will want to learn about all of the challenges and developments that are addressed here.


Recognition And Enforcement Of Foreign Arbitral Awards

RRP $763.99

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The 1958 New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards is without a doubt the single most important treaty in the field of international commercial arbitration, and has enjoyed remarkable success over its half-century of use. It has been praised as a convention which and#8216;perhaps could lay claim to be the most effective instance of international legislation in the entire history of commercial law.and#8217;

In honour of the Conventionand#8217;s fiftieth anniversary, outstanding scholars of international commercial arbitration have contributed to this comprehensive commentary. Following a design calling for article-by-article analysis (or even, in the case of the crucial Article 5, by sub-article), this unique book provides an in-depth analysis of the Conventionand#8217;s first fifty years in light of internationally accessible case law from a wide range of jurisdictions around the world. In so doing it greatly clarifies and enhances our knowledge of both the theoretical underpinnings and the practical application of the Convention in its global context.

The authors, each of whom is an experienced practitioner in the field of international arbitration, draw on experience in a wide variety of national jurisdictions. In addition to drafting chapters independently, each has made invaluable contributions to other authorsand#8217; chapters. Authoritative case law research was further provided by dozens of contributors with expertise in specific jurisdictions worldwide.

The analysis thoroughly covers the major issues that have arisen in the application of the Convention, including the following:

  • the use of reservations made by Contracting States;
  • the distinctions between recognition and enforcement and between recognition sought at the seat of the arbitration and outside the seat;
  • the role of the courts in reviewing arbitral awards and, in particular, the Conventionand#8217;s focus on safeguarding due process standards;
  • the and#8220;more favourable rightsand#8221; principle embodied in Article VII(1);
  • the relevance of forum shopping and asset spotting to the application of the Convention; and
  • the role of formalities and formalism.

The end result is an invaluable work that will prove enormously useful to all international commercial arbitration practitioners and scholars, regardless of location.

'In my opinion, the new commentary is a andquot;mustandquot; for any practitioner in the field of international arbitration. Its particular value consists in its systematic approach both to analysing every element of each provision of the convention and to providing the reader, for each such provision, with leading court decisions from around the world to show how the convention works in practice. There is good reason to hope with the editors (and with Karl-Heinz Band#246;ckstiegel, who wrote the foreword) that the commentary will contribute to the development of a more uniform standard for the application of the convention.'

Klaus Sachs, partner at CMS Hasche Sigle in Munich, in Global Arbitration Review, March 2011



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